The Team

The Team

To contact a member of the team please email: multipeptide@gstt.nhs.uk or telephone 0207 188 1929.

Study Doctors

Dr Jake Powrie

Dr Jake Powrie

Dr Powrie is a consultant and honorary senior lecturer in diabetes and endocrinology. He was appointed to this position in 1997 and has led this clinical service, one of the largest units in the UK, since 1998. Dr Powrie studied medicine at the University of Aberdeen and, following postgraduate medical training, moved to St Thomas’ Hospital to complete an MD in potential novel therapies for type 2 diabetes.

After this he spent five years completing higher specialist training before being appointed into his current consultant position.

Dr Powrie practises in all aspects of diabetes and endocrinology with a special interest in type 1 diabetes and thyroid disease.

 Dr Yuk Fun Liu

Dr Yuk-Fun Liu

After completing her specialist registrar training in Diabetes and Endocrinology, Dr Liu joined the lab in 2011 as a Diabetes UK Clinical Training Fellow and PhD student. Dr Liu’s work centres around peptide immunotherapy using a proinsulin peptide in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients. The focus of her research will be T-cell receptor and gene microarray changes induced by peptide administration.

Scientific Advisors

Professor Mark Peakman

Professor Mark Peakman

Mark Peakman trained in medicine at University College London and pursued postgraduate training in clinical immunology. After he received his PhD based on studies of the immune system in type 1 diabetes he held a senior clinical research fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh. He subsequently returned to the UK and now oversees a research group at King’s College London in the Department of Immunobiology.

The main focus of the research is the role of immune cells (T lymphocytes) in the cause of type 1 diabetes. In particular, the group has defined the critical targets for T cells that appear to have a role in the destruction of insulin-producing cells, and key immunological pathways through which this damage is mediated. More recently, the work has led to the definition of targets enabling the design of a novel “peptide immunotherapy” approach to slowing progression of type 1 diabetes.

Study Nurses

Laura Adams

Laura Adams

Laura is a Diabetes Research Nurse for Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital (GSTT). She trained at King’s College London where she gained her degree in adult nursing. Since qualifying as a nurse in 2005, she has completed postgraduate courses in Practical Diabetes and Mentorship and is currently studying at Masters level in Evaluating Healthcare Practise. Before joining the research team at GSTT, Laura was a clinical sister in an Acute Medical Unit where she was responsible for the running of the department on a day to day basis and worked closely with the Diabetes team. She has had a keen interest in Diabetes since qualifying and has worked alongside the Diabetes teams whilst working as a staff nurse.

Laura is currently on maternity leave and will be returning in January 2017.

 

Sharon

Sharon Jones

Currently I am working as a Senior Clinical Research Nurse in the NIHR Clinical Research Facility at Guy’s Hospital. I am responsible for the overall smooth running of several (about 4 – 5) clinical trials. I am also involved in other clinical trials (about 10 – 20) within the team. We are responsible for supporting the transition of our department to phase 1 accreditation status. This involves frequent audits, writing and adhering to Standard Operating Procedures and managing quality in real time. I have a management and education responsibility.

I qualified as a nurse, then known as RGN in 1990, and since then have gained a wide range of NHS clinical and research experience in a variety of settings on the ward, in the operating theatre and as part of the NIHR infrastructure. I completed a B.Sc (Hons) in Nursing for Health in 2001, and have subsequently attended training in many aspects of research; MHRA inspections, research passports, statistics and user involvement.
I have worked as a research nurse since 1997, when I helped with a neurovascular inpatient CTIMP study. I have therefore seen the transition of Good Clinical Practice into law and experienced the NIHR infrastructure development, which has vastly improved the research opportunity within the NHS. I have worked at Grade G then Band 7 for the past 15 years. Much of the experience I have is in immunological CTIMPS, but also in a variety of different research trials of all phases. I am currently working at Masters level having completed a module in Leadership and about to commence ‘Professional Development and Change Management’. I am dedicated to furthering research in the NHS with patient involvement.

Kate headshot

Kate Allan

Kate is a Clinical Research Nurse for the Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital NIHR Clinical Research Facility for Experimental Medicine. She trained at King’s College London where she gained her degree in adult nursing.  At the Clinical Research Facility Kate is a research nurse for a range of early phase studies in areas such as diabetes, oncology and respiratory medicine.  Before joining the research team in 2015, Kate worked as a staff nurse in oncology critical care.

Trial Coordination

Rhanya Chaabane

Rhanya Chaabane

Rhanya is a Diabetes Research Coordinator at Guy’s and St Thomas’s Hospital and has been here since 2013. She has spent the past year working on intervention studies in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. She has a BSc (Hons) in Neuroscience and is currently studying towards her Masters in Clinical Research. Rhanya has previously worked as lead clinical trial associate at a clinical research organisation specialising in oncology, planning and coordinating multiple global studies.

Laboratory

Dr Sefina Arif

Dr Sefina Arif

Sefina’s research is focused on understanding the role of human T cells in the development of type 1 diabetes. T cells secrete cytokines which act as messengers that orchestrate the immune response in response to pathogens. In type 1 diabetes the balance of these cytokines is perturbed leading to a polarisation towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype and much of her research is directed at examining this balance in heath and disease. In addition, she is currently working on the identification of previously unknown epitopes that are generated in response to autoantigen-vaccination in patients with type 1 diabetes. Sefina and her team hope that this will provide an insight into the pathology of type 1 diabetes and have implications for immune-therapeutic approaches.